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Rapid inventory in Peru

November 27, 2012

Rapid inventory in Peru

A month-long survey of the Ere, Campuya and upper Algodón river basins in Peru revealed 11 species new to science

A month-long survey of the Ere, Campuya and upper Algodón river basins in Peru revealed 11 species new to science. From Oct. 12 to Nov. 10, Robert Stallard, a STRI staff scientist and research hydrologist at the U.S. Geological Survey, took part in a rapid inventory led by the Field Museum in Chicago to survey an area never previously explored by scientists. The three rivers flow into the Putumayo River, which forms the border between Peru and Colombia.

Their international team of 14 biologists surveyed three sites in the heart of the area while another team of seven social scientists identified the aspirations and natural resource use of the Kichwa and Murui (Huitoto) indigenous people living in communities along the Putumayo. The results of the survey are still being tabulated, but in addition to the 11 new species recorded so far, they logged 316 species of birds, 68 frog species and ten species of monkeys.

The Field Museum's efforts in Peru over the last ten years have helped the government declare 12 new protected areas that cover more than 17.2 million acres of new conservation lands in the upper Amazon basin.

“Together with the local indigenous residents, we are using our findings to push for the creation of a 896,384-hectare conservation area,” says Corine Vriesendorp, Andes-Amazon Director at the Field Museum.

http://fieldmuseum.org/explore/department/ecco/rapid-inventories

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