Carlos Jaramillo

David Farris

David W. Farris

David W. Farris

Post Doc

 

Education

B.A. 2000, Geology, Macalester College, Honors Thesis title: Pluton emplacement and associated phenomena of the South Cascade Stock, North Cascades, Washington.
GPA: 3.48

Ph.D. 2006, structure / tectonics / magmatic systems at University of Southern
California. Dissertation title: Magmatic and tectonic modification of convergent margins: an example from southern Alaska.
GPA: 3.87

Grants and Awards

Fieldwork

Teaching Experience

Other Research Experience

Field supervision of undergraduate senior theses

George Tangalos, Carleton College, 2003: Genesis and contamination of the Kodiak batholith, Kodiak Island, Alaska: Using d18O to quantify the assimilated component of the batholith.

Ryan Prose, University of Southern California, 2005: Whole rock and oxygen isotope geochemistry of the Ruth pluton: Evidence of a slab-window?

Publications
Peer-reviewed papers

Farris, D.W., Haeussler, P., Friedman, R., Paterson, S.R., Saltus, R.W., Ayuso, R., 2006, Emplacement of the Kodiak batholith: A consequence of slab-window migration: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 118, no. 11/12, p. 1360-1376.

Craddock, John. P., Farris, David W., and Roberson, Aimee, 2004, Calcite twinning constraints on stress-strain fields along the mid-Atlantic ridge, Iceland. Geology: Vol. 32, no 1.

Farris, D. W., Haeussler, P.J., accepted, Selected geologic maps of the Kodiak batholith and other Paleocene intrusive rocks, Kodiak Island, Alaska: U.S. Geologic Survey Geologic Investigations Series Maps, 1 sheet, 7 plates, scale 1:50,000.

Farris, D.W. and Paterson, S.R., accepted, Physical contamination of silicic magmas and fractal fragmentation of xenoliths in Paleocene plutons on Kodiak Island, AK: Canadian Mineralogist.

Paterson, S.R., and Farris, D.W., accepted pending revision, Downward host rock transport and the formation of rim monoclines during the emplacement of Cordilleran batholiths: Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh: Earth Sciences.

Farris, D.W., in review, Construction and evolution of the Kodiak Talkeetna island arc crustal section: submitted to Crustal cross-sections from the western North America Cordillera and elsewhere: Implications for tectonic and petrologic processes, R. Miller and A. Snoke, eds. (GSA special paper).

Farris, D.W. and Paterson, S.R., in revision, Slab-window segmentation and variations between the western and eastern Sanak-Baranof belt, southern Alaska: to be resubmitted to Tectonics.

Farris, D.W. in prep, Tectonic and petrologic evolution of the Kodiak batholith and the trenchward magmatic belt, Kodiak Island, AK: Juxtaposition along the Contact fault: to be submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research.

Abstracts

Farris, D.W., 2006, Construction of an island arc: a comparison between the Kodiak and the Tonsina-Nelchina Talkeetna arc crustal sections: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 38, no. 5, p. 92.

Farris, D.W, and S.R. Paterson, 2006, Spreading-ridge subduction and the kinematic and magmatic evolution of the Sanak-Baranof belt, southern Alaska: Geological Society of America, Backbone of the Americas meeting.

Farris, D.W., Haeussler, P.J. and Ullrich, Thomas, 2005, The Kodiak batholith and the trenchward Ghost Rocks Fm. magmatic belt, Kodiak Island, Ak: Tectonic juxtaposition or two discrete events?: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 37, no. 7, p. 80.

Ayuso, R.A., Haeussler, P.J., Bradley, D.C., Farris, D.W., and Colvin, A.S., 2005, The effects of ridge subduction on chemical and isotopic zoning of the kodiak batholith, southern Alaska: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 37, no. 7.

Farris, David W., Bradley, D., Haeussler, Peter J., and Paterson, Scott R., 2004, Relationships between spreading-ridge subduction and the flare-up in arc magmatism in the Alaska-Aleutian batholith and the Coast plutonic complex: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 36, no. 5, p. 407.

Farris, D.W., Haeussler, P., Paterson, S. and Friedman, R., 2003, Slab-window segmentation and the evolution of the Sanak-Baranof belt: An example from Kodiak Island, AK. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs vol. 35, no. 6, 174-2.

Tangalos, George Eric, Farris, David W., Valley, J., Haeussler, P., and Haileab, B., 2003, Genesis and contamination of the Kodiak batholith, Kodiak Island, Alaska: Using d18O to quantify the assimilated component of the batholith. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 35, no. 6, p. 325.

Farris, D.W., Haeussler, P., Paterson, S. and Friedman, R., 2002, Slab-window processes in the Kodiak Island region, Alaska. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 34, no. 6, p. 375.

Farris, D.W. and Paterson, S., 2002, Statistical analysis of slab-window related plutons: The Sanak-Baranof belt of southern Alaska. Eos Trans. AGU, 83 (47).

Farris, David, Haeussler, Peter, Rieser, Michael, 2001, Formation of the Kodiak Batholith: a Consequence of Spreading Ridge Subduction. Eos Trans. AGU. 82

Farris, David, Paterson, Scott R., and Miller, Robert B., 2001, Does magmatism focus regional deformation: examples from the mid-crust, North Cascades, Washington: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 33, no. 7.

Farris, David W., 2000, Pluton emplacement and associated phenomena of the South Cascade Stock, North Cascades, Washington: Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 32, no. 7, pg. A-173

Farris, David W., Craddock, John, P., 1999, Examination of the Stress-Strain Fields Surrounding the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in Iceland Using Calcite Twin Analysis, Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 37, no. 7, pg. A-267.

Other publications

Farris, D.W. and M. Farris, 2000, "The Geology of Midwestern Climbing Areas."

In M. Farris, Rock Climbing: Minnesota and Wisconsin. Falcon Publishing, Helena, Montana.

General reseach philosophy

The long term goal of my research program is gain a more complete understanding plate interactions, transitions between specific tectonic regimes, arc magmatism, and the evolution of continental lithosphere. My philosophical approach to these research questions is to use whatever techniques are best suited to address a particular problem, and to investigate geologic questions at a variety of spatial lengths ranging from individual minerals to large-scale regional tectonics studies. However, most of my studies have been based on solid geologic fieldwork and mapping, with both larger- and smaller-scale inquiries arising from field observations. The field observations are then augmented with microstructural, geochemical, geochronologic, and geophysical data sets in order to gain a more complete understanding of the investigated phenomena. Many questions in tectonics and lithospheric evolution yield non-unique answers when addressed with single data sets, however when multiple independent data sets all point to the same answer one can be much more confident of the result. That is the basic scientific philosophy behind my research.

Current Research

My current research is essentially what is in my Ph.D. thesis. Each of the topics listed below are chapters from my thesis:

  1. EMPLACEMENT OF THE KODIAK BATHOLITH AND SLAB-WINDOW MIGRATION
  2. TECTONIC AND PETROLOGIC EVOLUTION OF THE KODIAK BATHOLITH AND THE TRENCHWARD MAGMATIC BELT, KODIAK ISLAND, AK: JUXTAPOSITION ALONG THE CONTACT FAULT
  3. SLAB-WINDOW SEGMENTATION AND VARIATIONS BETWEEN THE WESTERN AND EASTERN SANAK-BARANOF BELT, SOUTHERN ALASKA
  4. THE EFFECTS OF SPREADING-RIDGE SUBDUCTION ON ARC MAGMATISM
  5. CONTAMINATION OF SILICIC MAGMAS AND FRACTAL FRAGMENTATION OF XENOLITHS IN PALEOCENE PLUTONS ON KODIAK ISLAND, AK
  6. DOWNWARD HOST ROCK TRANSPORT AND THE FORMATION OF RIM MONOCLINES DURING THE EMPLACEMENT OF CORDILLERAN BATHOLITHS
  7. CONSTRUCTION AND EVOLUTION OF THE KODIAK TALKEETNA ISLAND ARC CRUSTAL SECTION

Future research projects

  1. The relationship of arc magmatism to transitions in plate tectonic regimes.
    Most magmatic arcs around the world exhibit cyclical periods of activity, with the majority of plutonic material being emplaced in temporally short-lived high flux events. During the Paleocene and Eocene, southern Alaska and British Columbia experienced an outboard spreading-ridge subduction event and an inboard high flux event in the arc, both in the Alaska-Aleutian batholith and the Coast plutonic complex. However, the physical connection between the two temporally similar events is uncertain. One of the arc batholiths related to this event is the McKinley intrusive suite of south central Alaska. Better understanding and regional integration of their temporal, physical and chemical evolution will greatly improve our understanding of the connection between tectonic transitions and arc periodicity.
  2. Detrital zircon history of the Kodiak accretionary complex
    The long-term evolution of continents is essentially a story of mass redistribution both within continental lithosphere and between the crust and the mantle. Aside from magmatic activity another major mass redistribution mechanism along convergent margins is the formation of large accretionary prisms. The majority of the Chugach accretionary complex in southern Alaska formed over just a few million years, and is nearly as voluminous as the accreted Wrangelia composite island arc terrane located immediately to the north. A detailed detrital zircon study of the Kodiak accretionary complex will place quantitative constraints on the duration of its construction, and allow inferences about arc activity (from which the sediments were derived) and regional tectonics (e.g. northward translation and the Baja B.C. hypothesis).
  3. General tectonic evolution of the North Pacific and the North American cordillera
    The North American cordillera is a natural laboratory to study the evolution of continental crust. Over the past several hundred million years it has been modified by many different types of tectonic interactions including: subduction, transpression/transtension, both compressional and extensional tectonics and various episodes of terrane collision and accretion. All of the above tectonic interactions have been coupled or overprinted by magmatic activity and mantle influence. My general goal for cordilleran tectonic studies is to better understand and constrain the interactions between all of the above modifications to the crust and lithosphere.
  4. The construction and evolution of arc crustal sections
    Exhumed crustal sections are geologically important because they allow basic crustal structure to be viewed directly. The Talkeetna island arc is one of the two exhumed arcs in the world that expose rocks from the mantle though the upper crust. The Kodiak section is the least studied portion of this arc. Further work will help to clarify crustal structure in island arcs, the processes by which they form, and will potentially provide information on the transformation of mafic island arc crust into granodioritic continental crust.
  5. Melting and assimilation processes in the Kodiak batholith
    Oxygen isotope and geochemical data indicate that the Kodiak batholith is composed of >50 percent partial melts of accretionary prism metasedimentary rocks. In the center of the batholith, voluminous zones of restitic and partially assimilated host-rock xenoliths are present. However, along its margins shattered, but otherwise unaltered host rock fragments exist. Due to these contrasting xenolith populations host rock assimilation can be studied at different temporal points, allowing for a more complete history to be reconstructed. Host rock assimilation is potentially an important process in many plutonic systems, and recent studies have suggested that textural evidence for it can be destroyed very quickly leaving it more difficult to detect.