Training in Tropical Taxonomy

2009 Courses

NSF-PASI Advanced Tropical Phycology Course Participating Experts

Participating Experts   Information
Juan M. Lopez-Bautista
Juan M. Lopez-Bautista
Website
jlopez@bama.ua.edu
 

I am interested in the biodiversity, systematics, and evolution of algae. Currently we are using gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses along with morphology-based classification hypotheses to investigate algal evolutionary trends. Marine algae, particularly red algae, as well as tropical terrestrial algae have been the main foci of my research. Our research has shown that: many of these terrestrial lineages of tropical microchlorophytes are direct descendents of marine algae, and that tropical rainforests are algal biodiversity hot-spots.

My work is supported by the National Science Foundation's programs on Systematics (tropical subaerial algae) and Assembling the Tree of Life (RedToL).

Brian Wysor
Brian Wysor
Website
bwysor@rwu.edu
 

I am interested in the diversity and distribution of marine algae, the factors responsible for shaping worldwide distribution patterns, and the extent to which extant distributions have been altered through human mediation. My current research foci include the characterization of marine floristic diversity in Panama using morphological and molecular methods and the systematics of temperate and tropical green algae.

My work is supported by National Science Foundation’s Biodiversity Surveys and Inventories Program.

Suzanne Fredericq
Suzanne Fredericq
Website
slf9209@louisiana.edu

 

My main interests lie in discovering and analyzing patterns of morphological and molecular evolution in the Red Algae in the context of a collections-based research program. Our laboratory is also actively involved in assessing macroalgal diversity and biogeographic patterns throughout the deep offshore Gulf of Mexico hard bank communities.

My work is supported by National Science Foundation’s grant NSF DEB AToL 0937978 Systematics of the Peyssonneliaceae (Peyssonneliales), a family of crustose marine algae.

Wilson Freshwater
Wilson Freshwater
freshwaterw@uncw.edu

 

Dr. Freshwater is a marine phycologist who has been working with seaweeds since 1982. His current research interests include the evolution, taxonomy, and floristics of marine algae including the practical application of molecular and phylogenetic analyses to these questions.

My work is supported by National Science Foundation’s Biodiversity Surveys and Inventories Program.

Bernardo Antonio Perez da Gama

   

Rafael Riosmena R.
Rafael Riosmena-Rodriguez
riosmena@uabcs.mx


  My scientific interest is related to marine plants (seaweed, seagrasses and mangroves) and their role in evolutionary and ecological process. I am very interested in taxonomy and systematic of seaweeds using morphological, anatomical, ontogenetic, molecular and fossil data. I found very stimulating participate in the training of future generations in the best scientific standards and the use scientific information as tools for managing activities. Especially the review and update of national or international policies are major goals in my carrier. Scientist should be the critical voice of society and try to being more involved in the solution of many problems. I am very interested to participate in this course because is being develop in an area of the world who is pristine and provide the window of opportunity to train new people in this discipline and also understand better the taxonomy and ecology of rhodolith beds in those areas
Nadine Schubert
Nadine Schubert

  My research interests are related to the understanding of the photosynthetic performance of seagrasses and macroalgae and the photoacclimatory mechanisms required for maintaining the photosynthetic rates under different environmental conditions. I have a special interest on photoprotection and, recently, on calcification in the coral reef environment. I am currently investigating the importance of calcification by coral reef macrophytes on local and global carbon fluxes and the effect of global climate change (rise of temperature, decrease of pH) on photosynthesis, calcification and carbon budgets in the coral reef system.
Guillermo Diaz-Pulido
Guillermo Diaz-Pulido

  My research work focuses on the ecology of coral reef algae, particularly in the context of reef degradation and global climate change. I am interested in examining the roles of ecological processes such as e.g. eutrophication, overfishing and disturbances in controlling the early and adult life stages of reef algae. Competition between corals and algae and the roles of warming-induced coral bleaching events in driving ecological shifts from corals to algae are also central topics of my research activities. I am currently investigating the impacts of ocean acidification due to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide on the biology and physiology of a range of coral reef algae.
Amy Driskell
Amy Driskell
driskella@si.edu
 
As Project Manager for the Smithsonian's DNA Barcode of Life program, I am responsible for facilitating new DNA barcode projects and overseeing their progress. I have been working with Rachel and the Bocas taxonomy courses since 2006. We have sampled and sequenced large samples of a number of marine invertebrate groups, as well as algae. Our goal is to produce a thoroughly sampled, expertly identified, museum-vouchered publicly available database of DNA barcodes for all species collected at the the Bocas del Toro station. This database will be allow researchers who are not taxonomists to identify the species with which they are working, will create the possibility of comparison with other large DNA barcode samples from around the world, and can assist working taxonomists with new species discovery, among other things.
Steve Paton
Steven Paton
Website
patons@si.edu
 
As Director of the OBio, my primary mission is the development of an integrated network of websites and on-line databases, and the digitization of our institutional collections. My aim is to put the greatest quantity of high-quality, scientific information on to the web in such a manner that promotes both the discovery and the utilization of this information by the widest possible audience. My ultimate aim is to be able to document on the web all of the research that goes on at STRI, as well as to showcase as much of Panama’s incredible biodiversity as possible.
Erick Ask
Erick Ask
Erick.Ask@fmc.com
FMC Corporation
  I am interested in the commercial production of marine macroalgae through marine agronomy and managed harvests of wild resources. In the field of marine agronomy I want to see increasing productivity of farmers through the development of best practices, improved farming systems and cultivated strains. For wild resources my interest is in developing and implementing effective management plans that allow for sustainable and economically viable harvest of the resource.
Dr. Rachel Collin
Rachel Collin
Website
collinr@si.edu
 

I am a STRI staff scientist and the director of the Bocas del Toro Research Station. In this capacity I have worked to develop the outreach programs, biodiversity database, and the Training in Tropical Taxonomy program at the station. With my other hat on, I am a systematist working on the evolution and life histories of calyptreaid gastropods.

I am also PI on the PASI grant "OISE-0819205 PASI: Advanced Tropical Phycology: Integrating Modern and Traditional Techniques to the Study of Tropical Algae"

Back to PASI ATP Course